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Cryptocurrency companies use ‘backdoor’ listings to ease into mainstream

Representations of the Ripple, Bitcoin, Etherum and Litecoin virtual currencies are seen on a PC motherboard in this illustration picture, February 13, 2018. REUTERS/Dado Ruvic/IllustrationFebruary 22, 2019
By Alun John and Anna Irrera
HONG KONG (Reuters) – Several cryptocurrency exchanges have moved closer to mainstream markets by buying listed companies, looking to raise funds and present themselves as embedded in the traditional financial services world they once spurned.
In the most recent deal, U.S. crypto broker-dealer Voyager Digital on Feb. 11 achieved a “backdoor” listing on Toronto’s Venture Exchange after it bought control of mineral exploration firm UC Resources.
Such purchases, also known as reverse mergers, allow companies to offer shares to the public without the rigors and regulatory scrutiny of a full initial public offering (IPO).
“Many (cryptocurrency) exchanges have put a lot of strategic effort into trying to legitimize their operations and their reputations, and for some there’s an assumption that having some exposure to the traditional public market will help,” said Fei Ding’an, managing partner at Ledger Capital, a digital asset investment firm.
Japan’s Financial Services Agency (FSA) is the only major national regulator so far to have drawn up a definitive framework to govern digital assets and the platforms where they are traded.
In January, OKC Holdings, a company controlled by Star Xu, the founder of crypto-exchange OK Coin, bought 60.5 percent of LEAP Holdings,, a Hong Kong-listed construction firm, for HK$484 million ($61.69 million).
Days later, the parent of Korean crypto exchange Bithumb announced plans for a U.S. listing via the purchase of Blockchain Industries.
Last year, investors that included the co-founders of crypto-exchange software producer ANX International bought a controlling stake in Hong Kong-listed marketing firm Branding China, while Huobi, a Singapore based exchange, bought a 72 percent stake in Hong Kong-listed power electrical company Pantronics Holdings.
Voyager said its listed shares could help fund growth.
“Being a public company enables Voyager to operate with the transparency that the crypto market deserves from its institutions,” Voyager CEO Steve Ehrlich said in an email.
Neither Huobi nor OKCoin has given details of their plans for the purchases.
ANX International remains separate from the renamed BC Group, but since the change in ownership the listed unit has launched new businesses that include a digital asset trading and exchange platform.
A spokesman for BC Group said being publicly traded gave clients “additional confidence in knowing we are a credible company and here for the long game.”
Spokespeople for OKCoin and Huobi declined to comment.
Neither Bithumb nor its parent Blockchain Exchange Alliance responded to requests for comment.
LEGITIMACY
Crypto experts said the deals could help the industry gain greater mainstream acceptance.
The reputation of cryptocurrencies, and particularly exchanges, has been hit hard by fears of price volatility and possible uses for laundering money alongside high-profile hacks and infrastructure failures.
Last year, the New York attorney general’s office warned that several cryptocurrency exchanges were plagued by poor market surveillance and pervasive conflicts of interest, saying some may be operating illegally.
This month, $137 million in cryptocurrencies was frozen in the user accounts of Canadian digital platform Quadriga after the founder, the only person with the password to gain access, died unexpectedly.
The crypto market peaked in late 2017, when trading volumes surged and bitcoin, the largest cryptocurrency, reached a high just above $20,000. Bitcoin’s price has fallen more 80 percent since then, and trading volumes have slumped.
Some exchanges may also feel pressure from investors seeking a means of realizing their profits.
“With the market turning south and regulators not being happy, this is an opportunity to satisfy investors and founders who are looking for an exit,” said Zennon Kapron, director at financial technology consultancy Kapronasia.
WRESTLING WITH REGULATORS
Public listings of cryptocurrency exchanges also pose a challenge for regulators, who are only beginning to grapple with the issues of overseeing the trading of digital currencies.
Japan’s FSA became the first major jurisdiction to regulate the exchanges in 2016, but has since refined its rules to allow the industry to largely self-regulate.
In the United States, New York state has, so far, issued a handful of so-called BitLicences for companies doing any sort of virtual currency business.
Both Hong Kong’s market watchdog, the Securities and Futures Commission, and the Hong Kong Exchange declined to comment.
But the commission is considering whether some cryptocurrency trading platforms are suitable for regulation, a process it hopes to finish this year, its chief executive, Ashley Alder, told legislators on Tuesday.
Hong Kong officials have already questioned the sustainability of crypto businesses when last year, the world’s largest makers of cryptocurrency mining rigs did not follow through on IPO plans in Hong Kong, in part because of the questions officials raised.
“It’s possible a crypto exchange could incubate a new crypto business inside a Hong Kong-listed company, maintain the listed company’s existing operations, and not be treated as a new IPO, but it is a very difficult tightrope to walk,” said a person familiar with the listing committee’s processes, speaking anonymously because he was not authorized to speak to the media on the subject.
The Hong Kong Stock Exchange’s Listing Committee must be satisfied that a company’s business is sustainable before it can list. The miners’ bids were stymied by fears that the falling price of bitcoin made their business models unworkable, sources said.
Although backdoor listings are permitted in most countries, some regulators, including those in Hong Kong, can review the deals and can in some circumstances require a full IPO instead.
“Crypto companies may struggle to demonstrate suitability for listing given the state of regulation of the industry and uncertain business models,” said Jason Sung, a Hong Kong-based partner at law firm Herbert Smith Freehills.
Exchanges like Bithumb that are looking to the United States could also similar roadblocks.
The SEC has authority both over U.S. companies selling digital securities and companies conducting a reverse merger in the United States.
“Depending on what the companies are planning to do they very well might have to seek regulatory approval from the SEC or the CFTC,” said Richard Levin, chairman of the financial technology and regulatory practice at the U.S. law firm Polsinelli.
(Reporting by Alun John in Hong Kong and Anna Irrera in New York; Editing by Jennifer Hughes and Gerry Doyle)
Source: OANN
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Cryptocurrency companies use ‘backdoor’ listings to ease into mainstream

Representations of the Ripple, Bitcoin, Etherum and Litecoin virtual currencies are seen on a PC motherboard in this illustration picture, February 13, 2018. REUTERS/Dado Ruvic/IllustrationFebruary 22, 2019
By Alun John and Anna Irrera
HONG KONG (Reuters) – Several cryptocurrency exchanges have moved closer to mainstream markets by buying listed companies, looking to raise funds and present themselves as embedded in the traditional financial services world they once spurned.
In the most recent deal, U.S. crypto broker-dealer Voyager Digital on Feb. 11 achieved a “backdoor” listing on Toronto’s Venture Exchange after it bought control of mineral exploration firm UC Resources.
Such purchases, also known as reverse mergers, allow companies to offer shares to the public without the rigors and regulatory scrutiny of a full initial public offering (IPO).
“Many (cryptocurrency) exchanges have put a lot of strategic effort into trying to legitimize their operations and their reputations, and for some there’s an assumption that having some exposure to the traditional public market will help,” said Fei Ding’an, managing partner at Ledger Capital, a digital asset investment firm.
Japan’s Financial Services Agency (FSA) is the only major national regulator so far to have drawn up a definitive framework to govern digital assets and the platforms where they are traded.
In January, OKC Holdings, a company controlled by Star Xu, the founder of crypto-exchange OK Coin, bought 60.5 percent of LEAP Holdings,, a Hong Kong-listed construction firm, for HK$484 million ($61.69 million).
Days later, the parent of Korean crypto exchange Bithumb announced plans for a U.S. listing via the purchase of Blockchain Industries.
Last year, investors that included the co-founders of crypto-exchange software producer ANX International bought a controlling stake in Hong Kong-listed marketing firm Branding China, while Huobi, a Singapore based exchange, bought a 72 percent stake in Hong Kong-listed power electrical company Pantronics Holdings.
Voyager said its listed shares could help fund growth.
“Being a public company enables Voyager to operate with the transparency that the crypto market deserves from its institutions,” Voyager CEO Steve Ehrlich said in an email.
Neither Huobi nor OKCoin has given details of their plans for the purchases.
ANX International remains separate from the renamed BC Group, but since the change in ownership the listed unit has launched new businesses that include a digital asset trading and exchange platform.
A spokesman for BC Group said being publicly traded gave clients “additional confidence in knowing we are a credible company and here for the long game.”
Spokespeople for OKCoin and Huobi declined to comment.
Neither Bithumb nor its parent Blockchain Exchange Alliance responded to requests for comment.
LEGITIMACY
Crypto experts said the deals could help the industry gain greater mainstream acceptance.
The reputation of cryptocurrencies, and particularly exchanges, has been hit hard by fears of price volatility and possible uses for laundering money alongside high-profile hacks and infrastructure failures.
Last year, the New York attorney general’s office warned that several cryptocurrency exchanges were plagued by poor market surveillance and pervasive conflicts of interest, saying some may be operating illegally.
This month, $137 million in cryptocurrencies was frozen in the user accounts of Canadian digital platform Quadriga after the founder, the only person with the password to gain access, died unexpectedly.
The crypto market peaked in late 2017, when trading volumes surged and bitcoin, the largest cryptocurrency, reached a high just above $20,000. Bitcoin’s price has fallen more 80 percent since then, and trading volumes have slumped.
Some exchanges may also feel pressure from investors seeking a means of realizing their profits.
“With the market turning south and regulators not being happy, this is an opportunity to satisfy investors and founders who are looking for an exit,” said Zennon Kapron, director at financial technology consultancy Kapronasia.
WRESTLING WITH REGULATORS
Public listings of cryptocurrency exchanges also pose a challenge for regulators, who are only beginning to grapple with the issues of overseeing the trading of digital currencies.
Japan’s FSA became the first major jurisdiction to regulate the exchanges in 2016, but has since refined its rules to allow the industry to largely self-regulate.
In the United States, New York state has, so far, issued a handful of so-called BitLicences for companies doing any sort of virtual currency business.
Both Hong Kong’s market watchdog, the Securities and Futures Commission, and the Hong Kong Exchange declined to comment.
But the commission is considering whether some cryptocurrency trading platforms are suitable for regulation, a process it hopes to finish this year, its chief executive, Ashley Alder, told legislators on Tuesday.
Hong Kong officials have already questioned the sustainability of crypto businesses when last year, the world’s largest makers of cryptocurrency mining rigs did not follow through on IPO plans in Hong Kong, in part because of the questions officials raised.
“It’s possible a crypto exchange could incubate a new crypto business inside a Hong Kong-listed company, maintain the listed company’s existing operations, and not be treated as a new IPO, but it is a very difficult tightrope to walk,” said a person familiar with the listing committee’s processes, speaking anonymously because he was not authorized to speak to the media on the subject.
The Hong Kong Stock Exchange’s Listing Committee must be satisfied that a company’s business is sustainable before it can list. The miners’ bids were stymied by fears that the falling price of bitcoin made their business models unworkable, sources said.
Although backdoor listings are permitted in most countries, some regulators, including those in Hong Kong, can review the deals and can in some circumstances require a full IPO instead.
“Crypto companies may struggle to demonstrate suitability for listing given the state of regulation of the industry and uncertain business models,” said Jason Sung, a Hong Kong-based partner at law firm Herbert Smith Freehills.
Exchanges like Bithumb that are looking to the United States could also similar roadblocks.
The SEC has authority both over U.S. companies selling digital securities and companies conducting a reverse merger in the United States.
“Depending on what the companies are planning to do they very well might have to seek regulatory approval from the SEC or the CFTC,” said Richard Levin, chairman of the financial technology and regulatory practice at the U.S. law firm Polsinelli.
(Reporting by Alun John in Hong Kong and Anna Irrera in New York; Editing by Jennifer Hughes and Gerry Doyle)
Source: OANN
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Cryptocurrency companies use ‘backdoor’ listings to ease into mainstream

Representations of the Ripple, Bitcoin, Etherum and Litecoin virtual currencies are seen on a PC motherboard in this illustration picture, February 13, 2018. REUTERS/Dado Ruvic/IllustrationFebruary 22, 2019
By Alun John and Anna Irrera
HONG KONG (Reuters) – Several cryptocurrency exchanges have moved closer to mainstream markets by buying listed companies, looking to raise funds and present themselves as embedded in the traditional financial services world they once spurned.
In the most recent deal, U.S. crypto broker-dealer Voyager Digital on Feb. 11 achieved a “backdoor” listing on Toronto’s Venture Exchange after it bought control of mineral exploration firm UC Resources.
Such purchases, also known as reverse mergers, allow companies to offer shares to the public without the rigors and regulatory scrutiny of a full initial public offering (IPO).
“Many (cryptocurrency) exchanges have put a lot of strategic effort into trying to legitimize their operations and their reputations, and for some there’s an assumption that having some exposure to the traditional public market will help,” said Fei Ding’an, managing partner at Ledger Capital, a digital asset investment firm.
Japan’s Financial Services Agency (FSA) is the only major national regulator so far to have drawn up a definitive framework to govern digital assets and the platforms where they are traded.
In January, OKC Holdings, a company controlled by Star Xu, the founder of crypto-exchange OK Coin, bought 60.5 percent of LEAP Holdings,, a Hong Kong-listed construction firm, for HK$484 million ($61.69 million).
Days later, the parent of Korean crypto exchange Bithumb announced plans for a U.S. listing via the purchase of Blockchain Industries.
Last year, investors that included the co-founders of crypto-exchange software producer ANX International bought a controlling stake in Hong Kong-listed marketing firm Branding China, while Huobi, a Singapore based exchange, bought a 72 percent stake in Hong Kong-listed power electrical company Pantronics Holdings.
Voyager said its listed shares could help fund growth.
“Being a public company enables Voyager to operate with the transparency that the crypto market deserves from its institutions,” Voyager CEO Steve Ehrlich said in an email.
Neither Huobi nor OKCoin has given details of their plans for the purchases.
ANX International remains separate from the renamed BC Group, but since the change in ownership the listed unit has launched new businesses that include a digital asset trading and exchange platform.
A spokesman for BC Group said being publicly traded gave clients “additional confidence in knowing we are a credible company and here for the long game.”
Spokespeople for OKCoin and Huobi declined to comment.
Neither Bithumb nor its parent Blockchain Exchange Alliance responded to requests for comment.
LEGITIMACY
Crypto experts said the deals could help the industry gain greater mainstream acceptance.
The reputation of cryptocurrencies, and particularly exchanges, has been hit hard by fears of price volatility and possible uses for laundering money alongside high-profile hacks and infrastructure failures.
Last year, the New York attorney general’s office warned that several cryptocurrency exchanges were plagued by poor market surveillance and pervasive conflicts of interest, saying some may be operating illegally.
This month, $137 million in cryptocurrencies was frozen in the user accounts of Canadian digital platform Quadriga after the founder, the only person with the password to gain access, died unexpectedly.
The crypto market peaked in late 2017, when trading volumes surged and bitcoin, the largest cryptocurrency, reached a high just above $20,000. Bitcoin’s price has fallen more 80 percent since then, and trading volumes have slumped.
Some exchanges may also feel pressure from investors seeking a means of realizing their profits.
“With the market turning south and regulators not being happy, this is an opportunity to satisfy investors and founders who are looking for an exit,” said Zennon Kapron, director at financial technology consultancy Kapronasia.
WRESTLING WITH REGULATORS
Public listings of cryptocurrency exchanges also pose a challenge for regulators, who are only beginning to grapple with the issues of overseeing the trading of digital currencies.
Japan’s FSA became the first major jurisdiction to regulate the exchanges in 2016, but has since refined its rules to allow the industry to largely self-regulate.
In the United States, New York state has, so far, issued a handful of so-called BitLicences for companies doing any sort of virtual currency business.
Both Hong Kong’s market watchdog, the Securities and Futures Commission, and the Hong Kong Exchange declined to comment.
But the commission is considering whether some cryptocurrency trading platforms are suitable for regulation, a process it hopes to finish this year, its chief executive, Ashley Alder, told legislators on Tuesday.
Hong Kong officials have already questioned the sustainability of crypto businesses when last year, the world’s largest makers of cryptocurrency mining rigs did not follow through on IPO plans in Hong Kong, in part because of the questions officials raised.
“It’s possible a crypto exchange could incubate a new crypto business inside a Hong Kong-listed company, maintain the listed company’s existing operations, and not be treated as a new IPO, but it is a very difficult tightrope to walk,” said a person familiar with the listing committee’s processes, speaking anonymously because he was not authorized to speak to the media on the subject.
The Hong Kong Stock Exchange’s Listing Committee must be satisfied that a company’s business is sustainable before it can list. The miners’ bids were stymied by fears that the falling price of bitcoin made their business models unworkable, sources said.
Although backdoor listings are permitted in most countries, some regulators, including those in Hong Kong, can review the deals and can in some circumstances require a full IPO instead.
“Crypto companies may struggle to demonstrate suitability for listing given the state of regulation of the industry and uncertain business models,” said Jason Sung, a Hong Kong-based partner at law firm Herbert Smith Freehills.
Exchanges like Bithumb that are looking to the United States could also similar roadblocks.
The SEC has authority both over U.S. companies selling digital securities and companies conducting a reverse merger in the United States.
“Depending on what the companies are planning to do they very well might have to seek regulatory approval from the SEC or the CFTC,” said Richard Levin, chairman of the financial technology and regulatory practice at the U.S. law firm Polsinelli.
(Reporting by Alun John in Hong Kong and Anna Irrera in New York; Editing by Jennifer Hughes and Gerry Doyle)
Source: OANN
from MAGA First News https://magafirstnews.com/oan-newsroom/cryptocurrency-companies-use-backdoor-listings-to-ease-into-mainstream/
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Cryptocurrency companies use ‘backdoor’ listings to ease into mainstream

Representations of the Ripple, Bitcoin, Etherum and Litecoin virtual currencies are seen on a PC motherboard in this illustration picture, February 13, 2018. REUTERS/Dado Ruvic/IllustrationFebruary 22, 2019
By Alun John and Anna Irrera
HONG KONG (Reuters) – Several cryptocurrency exchanges have moved closer to mainstream markets by buying listed companies, looking to raise funds and present themselves as embedded in the traditional financial services world they once spurned.
In the most recent deal, U.S. crypto broker-dealer Voyager Digital on Feb. 11 achieved a “backdoor” listing on Toronto’s Venture Exchange after it bought control of mineral exploration firm UC Resources.
Such purchases, also known as reverse mergers, allow companies to offer shares to the public without the rigors and regulatory scrutiny of a full initial public offering (IPO).
“Many (cryptocurrency) exchanges have put a lot of strategic effort into trying to legitimize their operations and their reputations, and for some there’s an assumption that having some exposure to the traditional public market will help,” said Fei Ding’an, managing partner at Ledger Capital, a digital asset investment firm.
Japan’s Financial Services Agency (FSA) is the only major national regulator so far to have drawn up a definitive framework to govern digital assets and the platforms where they are traded.
In January, OKC Holdings, a company controlled by Star Xu, the founder of crypto-exchange OK Coin, bought 60.5 percent of LEAP Holdings,, a Hong Kong-listed construction firm, for HK$484 million ($61.69 million).
Days later, the parent of Korean crypto exchange Bithumb announced plans for a U.S. listing via the purchase of Blockchain Industries.
Last year, investors that included the co-founders of crypto-exchange software producer ANX International bought a controlling stake in Hong Kong-listed marketing firm Branding China, while Huobi, a Singapore based exchange, bought a 72 percent stake in Hong Kong-listed power electrical company Pantronics Holdings.
Voyager said its listed shares could help fund growth.
“Being a public company enables Voyager to operate with the transparency that the crypto market deserves from its institutions,” Voyager CEO Steve Ehrlich said in an email.
Neither Huobi nor OKCoin has given details of their plans for the purchases.
ANX International remains separate from the renamed BC Group, but since the change in ownership the listed unit has launched new businesses that include a digital asset trading and exchange platform.
A spokesman for BC Group said being publicly traded gave clients “additional confidence in knowing we are a credible company and here for the long game.”
Spokespeople for OKCoin and Huobi declined to comment.
Neither Bithumb nor its parent Blockchain Exchange Alliance responded to requests for comment.
LEGITIMACY
Crypto experts said the deals could help the industry gain greater mainstream acceptance.
The reputation of cryptocurrencies, and particularly exchanges, has been hit hard by fears of price volatility and possible uses for laundering money alongside high-profile hacks and infrastructure failures.
Last year, the New York attorney general’s office warned that several cryptocurrency exchanges were plagued by poor market surveillance and pervasive conflicts of interest, saying some may be operating illegally.
This month, $137 million in cryptocurrencies was frozen in the user accounts of Canadian digital platform Quadriga after the founder, the only person with the password to gain access, died unexpectedly.
The crypto market peaked in late 2017, when trading volumes surged and bitcoin, the largest cryptocurrency, reached a high just above $20,000. Bitcoin’s price has fallen more 80 percent since then, and trading volumes have slumped.
Some exchanges may also feel pressure from investors seeking a means of realizing their profits.
“With the market turning south and regulators not being happy, this is an opportunity to satisfy investors and founders who are looking for an exit,” said Zennon Kapron, director at financial technology consultancy Kapronasia.
WRESTLING WITH REGULATORS
Public listings of cryptocurrency exchanges also pose a challenge for regulators, who are only beginning to grapple with the issues of overseeing the trading of digital currencies.
Japan’s FSA became the first major jurisdiction to regulate the exchanges in 2016, but has since refined its rules to allow the industry to largely self-regulate.
In the United States, New York state has, so far, issued a handful of so-called BitLicences for companies doing any sort of virtual currency business.
Both Hong Kong’s market watchdog, the Securities and Futures Commission, and the Hong Kong Exchange declined to comment.
But the commission is considering whether some cryptocurrency trading platforms are suitable for regulation, a process it hopes to finish this year, its chief executive, Ashley Alder, told legislators on Tuesday.
Hong Kong officials have already questioned the sustainability of crypto businesses when last year, the world’s largest makers of cryptocurrency mining rigs did not follow through on IPO plans in Hong Kong, in part because of the questions officials raised.
“It’s possible a crypto exchange could incubate a new crypto business inside a Hong Kong-listed company, maintain the listed company’s existing operations, and not be treated as a new IPO, but it is a very difficult tightrope to walk,” said a person familiar with the listing committee’s processes, speaking anonymously because he was not authorized to speak to the media on the subject.
The Hong Kong Stock Exchange’s Listing Committee must be satisfied that a company’s business is sustainable before it can list. The miners’ bids were stymied by fears that the falling price of bitcoin made their business models unworkable, sources said.
Although backdoor listings are permitted in most countries, some regulators, including those in Hong Kong, can review the deals and can in some circumstances require a full IPO instead.
“Crypto companies may struggle to demonstrate suitability for listing given the state of regulation of the industry and uncertain business models,” said Jason Sung, a Hong Kong-based partner at law firm Herbert Smith Freehills.
Exchanges like Bithumb that are looking to the United States could also similar roadblocks.
The SEC has authority both over U.S. companies selling digital securities and companies conducting a reverse merger in the United States.
“Depending on what the companies are planning to do they very well might have to seek regulatory approval from the SEC or the CFTC,” said Richard Levin, chairman of the financial technology and regulatory practice at the U.S. law firm Polsinelli.
(Reporting by Alun John in Hong Kong and Anna Irrera in New York; Editing by Jennifer Hughes and Gerry Doyle)
Source: OANN
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Cryptocurrency companies use ‘backdoor’ listings to ease into mainstream

Representations of the Ripple, Bitcoin, Etherum and Litecoin virtual currencies are seen on a PC motherboard in this illustration picture, February 13, 2018. REUTERS/Dado Ruvic/IllustrationFebruary 22, 2019
By Alun John and Anna Irrera
HONG KONG (Reuters) – Several cryptocurrency exchanges have moved closer to mainstream markets by buying listed companies, looking to raise funds and present themselves as embedded in the traditional financial services world they once spurned.
In the most recent deal, U.S. crypto broker-dealer Voyager Digital on Feb. 11 achieved a “backdoor” listing on Toronto’s Venture Exchange after it bought control of mineral exploration firm UC Resources.
Such purchases, also known as reverse mergers, allow companies to offer shares to the public without the rigors and regulatory scrutiny of a full initial public offering (IPO).
“Many (cryptocurrency) exchanges have put a lot of strategic effort into trying to legitimize their operations and their reputations, and for some there’s an assumption that having some exposure to the traditional public market will help,” said Fei Ding’an, managing partner at Ledger Capital, a digital asset investment firm.
Japan’s Financial Services Agency (FSA) is the only major national regulator so far to have drawn up a definitive framework to govern digital assets and the platforms where they are traded.
In January, OKC Holdings, a company controlled by Star Xu, the founder of crypto-exchange OK Coin, bought 60.5 percent of LEAP Holdings,, a Hong Kong-listed construction firm, for HK$484 million ($61.69 million).
Days later, the parent of Korean crypto exchange Bithumb announced plans for a U.S. listing via the purchase of Blockchain Industries.
Last year, investors that included the co-founders of crypto-exchange software producer ANX International bought a controlling stake in Hong Kong-listed marketing firm Branding China, while Huobi, a Singapore based exchange, bought a 72 percent stake in Hong Kong-listed power electrical company Pantronics Holdings.
Voyager said its listed shares could help fund growth.
“Being a public company enables Voyager to operate with the transparency that the crypto market deserves from its institutions,” Voyager CEO Steve Ehrlich said in an email.
Neither Huobi nor OKCoin has given details of their plans for the purchases.
ANX International remains separate from the renamed BC Group, but since the change in ownership the listed unit has launched new businesses that include a digital asset trading and exchange platform.
A spokesman for BC Group said being publicly traded gave clients “additional confidence in knowing we are a credible company and here for the long game.”
Spokespeople for OKCoin and Huobi declined to comment.
Neither Bithumb nor its parent Blockchain Exchange Alliance responded to requests for comment.
LEGITIMACY
Crypto experts said the deals could help the industry gain greater mainstream acceptance.
The reputation of cryptocurrencies, and particularly exchanges, has been hit hard by fears of price volatility and possible uses for laundering money alongside high-profile hacks and infrastructure failures.
Last year, the New York attorney general’s office warned that several cryptocurrency exchanges were plagued by poor market surveillance and pervasive conflicts of interest, saying some may be operating illegally.
This month, $137 million in cryptocurrencies was frozen in the user accounts of Canadian digital platform Quadriga after the founder, the only person with the password to gain access, died unexpectedly.
The crypto market peaked in late 2017, when trading volumes surged and bitcoin, the largest cryptocurrency, reached a high just above $20,000. Bitcoin’s price has fallen more 80 percent since then, and trading volumes have slumped.
Some exchanges may also feel pressure from investors seeking a means of realizing their profits.
“With the market turning south and regulators not being happy, this is an opportunity to satisfy investors and founders who are looking for an exit,” said Zennon Kapron, director at financial technology consultancy Kapronasia.
WRESTLING WITH REGULATORS
Public listings of cryptocurrency exchanges also pose a challenge for regulators, who are only beginning to grapple with the issues of overseeing the trading of digital currencies.
Japan’s FSA became the first major jurisdiction to regulate the exchanges in 2016, but has since refined its rules to allow the industry to largely self-regulate.
In the United States, New York state has, so far, issued a handful of so-called BitLicences for companies doing any sort of virtual currency business.
Both Hong Kong’s market watchdog, the Securities and Futures Commission, and the Hong Kong Exchange declined to comment.
But the commission is considering whether some cryptocurrency trading platforms are suitable for regulation, a process it hopes to finish this year, its chief executive, Ashley Alder, told legislators on Tuesday.
Hong Kong officials have already questioned the sustainability of crypto businesses when last year, the world’s largest makers of cryptocurrency mining rigs did not follow through on IPO plans in Hong Kong, in part because of the questions officials raised.
“It’s possible a crypto exchange could incubate a new crypto business inside a Hong Kong-listed company, maintain the listed company’s existing operations, and not be treated as a new IPO, but it is a very difficult tightrope to walk,” said a person familiar with the listing committee’s processes, speaking anonymously because he was not authorized to speak to the media on the subject.
The Hong Kong Stock Exchange’s Listing Committee must be satisfied that a company’s business is sustainable before it can list. The miners’ bids were stymied by fears that the falling price of bitcoin made their business models unworkable, sources said.
Although backdoor listings are permitted in most countries, some regulators, including those in Hong Kong, can review the deals and can in some circumstances require a full IPO instead.
“Crypto companies may struggle to demonstrate suitability for listing given the state of regulation of the industry and uncertain business models,” said Jason Sung, a Hong Kong-based partner at law firm Herbert Smith Freehills.
Exchanges like Bithumb that are looking to the United States could also similar roadblocks.
The SEC has authority both over U.S. companies selling digital securities and companies conducting a reverse merger in the United States.
“Depending on what the companies are planning to do they very well might have to seek regulatory approval from the SEC or the CFTC,” said Richard Levin, chairman of the financial technology and regulatory practice at the U.S. law firm Polsinelli.
(Reporting by Alun John in Hong Kong and Anna Irrera in New York; Editing by Jennifer Hughes and Gerry Doyle)
Source: OANN
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Truth Behind the Dispute Between Roger Ver and OKCoin.

With some analysis, it's not hard to see the truth. Here is a deeper look at the dispute between OKCoin and Roger Ver! Let’s get past the basics quickly to the juicy bits!
Here comes the interesting bits:
Important, OKCoin (Jack Liu) received, reviewed and discussed with Roger Contract v7, specifically the termination at this date, after CZ publicly resigned. Handover process seems to be complete and smooth.
Early May
May 13 - Turning Point
Guess what, OKCoin never made good. Classic, in the same email, OKCoin (Jack Liu) swiftly went back on his own words:
Excuse 1. Rumors affects your payment on a contract?
Wow, just wow!!! Denying your own existence? Have you looked at your own website?
https://www.okcoin.com/about/index.do
“OKCoin was founded in 2013 and received a US$1m Angel Investment from Ventures Lab and Silicon Valley Venture Capitalist Tim Draper.
Excuse 4. Which entity did you use to pay before?
Wait!!! but you have, Jack! On Feb 23, 2015, Jack wrote: “Hi Roger, Star passed this over to me to arrange with you.”
Man up, Head of International, take responsibility!
Hello? Shouldn’t the company be investigating Jack Liu for wrongdoing instead, or Star himself?
May 14
From Jack Liu
May 14 - The King Appears
From Star Xu
Wait, CZ doesn’t work for you anymore. He resigned 3 months ago.
Wait, wait, wait! No! You told Jack! If you can’t remember, almighty King, here it is again:
On Feb 23, 2015, Jack wrote: “Hi Roger, Star passed this over to me to arrange with you…”
Please remember Feb 23, guys! After CZ resigned! You read the contract. Hello? They just seem to keep forgetting this.
Mr. King, if you have to find someone to blame. Jack is probably a much easier escape-goat than CZ. Jack probably doesn't know how to use PGP to protect himself. lol
May 15 - Fake Lawyer Appears
Interestingly, the non-English speaking lawyer signs the email not with a Chinese name, but with an English name.
People on Reddit points out the writing style of this mysterious lawyer is suspiciously similar to Star Xu’s writing style.
This mysterious lawyer has an OKCoin email address, but OKCoin has no in-house legal counsel.
A search on the Beijing government official lawyer database turned up only one lawyer with a matching name in pronunciation. This guy:
http://www.bjsf.gov.cn/publish/portal0/tab196/?itemid=10942850
According to his firm’s page:
http://www.jingzecn.com/info/chn/20121220/20121220152747.shtml
He is a Partner at his firm, and specializes in agriculture and land. It is highly unlikely that he is the lawyer for OKCoin, or even suitable for it.
Would any licensed lawyer agree to practice law in a language they don’t understand using Google Translate?
Now, has Star Xu or Jack Liu impersonated a lawyer? In addition to forging a document?
WOW!
Well, I think we can safely assume it won't take long for Roger’s Chinese speaking lawyer to verify this.
May 15 - Let’s Re-Confirm the Lawyer, Just One More Time
From Star Xu
Great, we got that.
May 17
From Li Yajun, the OKCoin "Lawyer", a simple and powerful response!
Does this sound like a King talking?
May 17 - Star Xu, the King, Steps Back In
From Star Xu:
Now he is eager to show the world again.
No King, the only person who could possibly lie to you about the contract terms is Jack, or yourself.
Important Note: this is BEFORE Contract_v8 dispute appeared. Star is already accusing Roger and CZ of lying, and/or colluding.
No, you didn’t! That’s how we got here.
You turned down ads yourself, while maintained footer link to OKCoin.com.
Okay, enough! You turned down Safello and ANX, who are willing to be paying customers. Why? Just because they are also bitcoin exchanges?
Two emails later, still from the King.
So now, the in-house lawyer with an OKCoin email address does not know the details of the company anymore?
What??? CEO of OKCoin, have you seen your own website. “OKCoin.com is operated by our Singapore company…”
Damn, I can’t count how many problems there are in that one statement. Your employee setup a personal company? Just to get a bank account, for OKCoin? Sounds like an end-run on the banking regulations in SG. Is that legal? I am sure Roger’s lawyers would be happy to check on that for you.
So now you want a new contract?
Why would you need lawyers when negotiating contracts?
I think we covered both of these points before. But keep repeating that! Very soon, it will be true!
Coming of CEO of OKCoin, you should resign, right now! Which CEO in history claimed their company do not exist? It's one thing coming from Jack, but very different coming from a CEO.
So, now you don’t want to go public. Understandably yes. But, you still went public first, with your pathetic blog post.
May 20,
King Becomes the “small bitcoin guy”, When He Forges a Document? Does this make sense from a psychological point of view? Trying to be small after you commit a crime? Honestly, I am not sure. I am not an expert.
From Star Xu:
But then proceeds to make a threat a few lines later:
Now, that's a very credible threat, and very considerate of you for Roger's reputation. OKCoin did go public first! Roger’s reputation seems to be just fine.
Oh now, you finally find a different version of the contract.
New is the key word here. Because it is indeed a brand NEW version of the contract you just created. It sure is interesting, for you.
So your assistant had THE copy the whole time? And you didn't know? Nice assistant! Or did she just bring it over to you from the printer?
Now, isn’t that convenient for you? You suddenly have a way to cancel the contract now.
In the entire contract, there are no spelling errors. In the last new statement, “givin” is spelled wrong! Typed it up in too much of a hurry?
OMG, do you take all of us as idiots? No, there is an obvious third, and only reason. You forged it, Mr. King.
You really like claw backs, Mr. King? Not going to be easy to claw back this one. This is not your shady futures exchange anymore. Wake up!
May 22 - Photoshop Time
Still from Star Xu:
Collage? Colleague? Did you just finish searching for a photoshop software, and the auto-correct remembered it?
Now you want to show again? Eager to show off your new photoshop project to the world? I thought you wanted to protect Roger’s reputation?
May 23 - Hello Digital Signatures
From Roger:
Oh damn! Fk! Sh!t! You didn’t see that one coming, did you? Suddenly, your little pet Collage project doesn’t look so hot anymore, does it?
Pretending to be a CTO turns out to be harder than pretending to be a lawyer, huh? CZ PGP signs emails he sends out. Try forging that, you liar!
Same day, From Star:
Oh dear, where is CZ when I need him the most, to take the blame!
So, let me get this straight. You are saying: “Roger and CZ signs a contract in Dec. CZ then stays at the company for 3 more months, after OKCoin makes 3 payments. When CZ resigns on Feb 17th, CZ leaves a signed Contract_v8 with your assistant in physical form, while Roger emails a signed Contract_v7 in digital form to Jack Liu (and yourself) to check on Feb 23rd. Less than a week after CZ left."
You think Roger was colluding with CZ on this one to screw OKCoin. That makes total sense, doesn't it?
And for a contract that’s worth only $10k/month? For those two guys? Give me a break! I think they have better things to do.
Now you need him!
You sure did just get the 2nd version. But you got one of them, v7, at least on Feb 23. If you didn’t read that, which you certainly will say so. Check the email from Jack Liu. On May 13 “Our lawyer reviewed the contract…” “Our lawyer views this contract as null …”
Shouldn't you be asking "Jack, my new Head of International, what's the problem?"
Wait, you still owe him $40k USD in salary? WTF? And expects him to do what for you? Lie? Oh sorry, I forgot you are the KING!
Now, I am beginning to understand the differences in direction
May 23
Roger reminds Star he emailed the contract to “you [Star] and Jack back in Feb”.
Star Xu back in King mode:
Sure, Mr. King, if forging documents and faking to be lawyers are small things in your company, then I don't know what you are busy with. It certainly is strange.
submitted by cryptoanalyst1 to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Buy/Sell Cheapest Bitcoins with Bank wire

For the entry and exit ways are not the same, but bank wire is feasible in each Exchanges, and bank fees are not included.
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ANX

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Deposit BTC: 0 -> Sell BTC: 0.5% -> Withdraw USD: $30
More exchanges reviews can be found here
submitted by desticy to BitcoinBeginners [link] [comments]

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